Tuesday, July 11, 2006

 

Toro Nagashi



Toro Nagashi is another of those beautiful Japanese traditions involving the difficult-to-photograph lantern. Toro Nagashi is related to Obon, the summer festival which celebrates the souls of those who have departed this world.



During Toro Nagashi, participants write the names of the deceased on lanterns, then set the lanterns afloat in water to help guide the souls (who have been visiting) back to the other world.

There is a particularly beautiful version of this festival in Tokyo. It takes place every July 13th, in Chidorigafuchi Park canal by the Imperial Palace. In this version of Toro Nagashi, lucky participants who lined up early enough will get to rent a boat. Then, on signal, everyone puts their lanterns in the water while an orchestra plays nostalgic music and a small fireworks display goes off. It is a beautiful sight, if a little bit harrowing what with all the sparklers, crashing boats and fireworks.


Comments:
The lantern lit—MUKAEBI—on the 13th will guide—show the way— the soul(s) of deceased person(s) to safely visit their loving family. Buddhists believe these souls will remain for the next few days with their family on earth. When the time comes for them to return to their place, around on the 15th-18th, the family will again light the lantern or burn small fire—OKURIBI—to guide the souls' safe journey. The most famous festival of this sort is the DAIMONJI-YAKI in Kyoto, which is held in the middle of August.
 
The lantern lit—MUKAEBI—on the 13th will guide—show the way— the soul(s) of deceased person(s) to safely visit their loving family. Buddhists believe these souls will remain for the next few days with their family on earth. When the time comes for them to return to their place, around on the 15th-18th, the family will again light the candle or burn small fire—OKURIBI—to guide the souls' safe journey. The most famous festival of this kind is the DAIMONJI-YAKI in Kyoto, which is held in the middle of August.
 
The lantern lit—MUKAEBI—on the 13th will guide—show the way— the soul(s) of deceased person(s) to safely visit their loving family. Buddhists believe these souls will remain for the next few days with their family on earth. When the time comes for them to return to their place, around on the 15th-18th, the family will again light the candle or burn small fire—OKURIBI—to guide the souls' safe journey. The most famous festival of this kind is the DAIMONJI-YAKI in Kyoto, which is held in the middle of August.
 
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For being difficult to photograph, you did a good job at them. With a manual film camera, that shot would be fairly easy to set up. For a regular digital camera, it is extreemly tough. I mostly just play with all the settings taking pictures until i get it right. After all, when you have 2GB of pictures possible, you can save the ones you really want.
 
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